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“The Capitalist Tool” Just Trolled Trump Over Coal & Nuclear Energy

If President* Donald Trump thought he could count on the Forbes media empire to help protect coal and nuclear power plants, well, he was wrong. In yet another sign that nobody likes coal, on Sunday, the self-described "home page for the world's business leaders" published a long contributor piece featuring an interview with the lead technical author of the Energy Department's notorious grid study, and she does not mince words

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Trump Or Not, Electricity Customers Want Renewable Energy

Big business nails down most of the attention for buying huge megawatts of renewable energy, but practically anyone who gets an electricity bill can order up renewables on a more modest scale. In effect, the consumer choice option lets people substitute 100% wind and/or solar power for their utility company's normal grid mix

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What Changed In The EV Market In October?

We published 509 articles in October. It's rather hard to read every single one — I'm not sure if anyone does, but I can tell you that I don't have time for that and I'm the director and chief editor of the site! We publish weekly and monthly roundups of the most popular articles, but I've felt like something was still lacking. So, I've decided to jump into a couple of new monthly reports — one for electric vehicles (this one) and one for solar energy + stationary energy storage

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Best deals on hybrid, electric, fuel-efficient cars for November 2017

This month's best deals for hybrid, electric, and fuel-efficient cars are in and buyers will find a handful of eco-friendly bargains. Most cars have held their spots from October 2017, but a few newcomers may surprise shoppers, including the brand-new 2018 Toyota Camry Hybrid. Read on to see where the best deals can be had. DON'T MISS: Costco...

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Helping NGOs make impacts across China

MIT's motto, "mens et manus" — "mind and hand" — is more than a slogan to MIT Professor Jing Wang. It's the reason she came to the Institute 16 years ago. Already an accomplished scholar of Chinese cultural studies, Wang wanted to do more than think about problems — she wanted to help solve them. Today, Wang is not only a professor with joint appointments in global studies and languages and comparative media studies, she is also the director of the MIT New Media Action Lab and the head of an influential nonprofit, …

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MIT researchers discuss the new “multi-messenger” era of astrophysics research

On Monday, Oct. 16, scientists from the National Science Foundation (NSF), representatives from the Laser Interferoment Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) Scientific Collaboration, and other researchers from ground-based and space-based observatories around the world announced the detection of GW170817 — gravitational waves resulting from the merger of two neutron stars. This detection was the first correlation between gravitational waves and electromagnetic signals in the form of gamma ray bursts and X-ray, …

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A new way to harness wasted methane

Methane gas, a vast natural resource, is often disposed of through burning, but new research by scientists at MIT could make it easier to capture this gas for use as fuel or a chemical feedstock. Many oil wells burn off methane — the largest component of natural gas — in a process called flaring, which currently wastes 150 billion cubic meters of the gas each year and generates a staggering 400 million tons of carbon dioxide, making this process a significant contributor to global warming. Letting the gas escape …

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Using artificial intelligence to improve early breast cancer detection

Every year 40,000 women die from breast cancer in the U.S. alone. When cancers are found early, they can often be cured. Mammograms are the best test available, but they're still imperfect and often result in false positive results that can lead to unnecessary biopsies and surgeries. One common cause of false positives are so-called “high-risk” lesions that appear suspicious on mammograms and have abnormal …

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New technique scours the genome for genes that combat disease

Using a modified version of the CRISPR genome-editing system, MIT researchers have developed a new way to screen for genes that protect against specific diseases. CRISPR is normally used to edit or delete genes from living cells. However, the MIT team adapted it to randomly turn on or off distinct gene sets across large populations of cells, allowing the researchers to identify genes that protect cells from a protein associated with Parkinson's disease. The new technology, described in the journal …