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Haynesville Shale Gas Production Increases to Highest Levels Since End of 2013

Recent increases in drilling activity and well production rates are raising natural gas production levels in the Haynesville region, according to EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO). Marketed natural gas production in Haynesville reached 6.9 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d) in September after remaining near 6.0 Bcf/d for the previous three years. The recent growth in Haynesville […] The post Haynesville Shale Gas Production Increases to Highest Levels Since End of 2013 appeared first on The Energy Collective.

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Ohio Court Overturns Law Preventing Cities From Voting on Anti-Fracking Measures

In a slight break with previous state policies that have encouraged fracking activity and new pipelines, the Ohio Supreme Court recently struck down a controversial provision restricting citizen efforts to vote locally on these and other issues through the ballot initiative process. Getting Out (of) the Vote The state Supreme Court ruling, which came on October 19, […] The post Ohio Court Overturns Law Preventing Cities From Voting on Anti-Fracking Measures appeared first on The Energy Collective. Click headline for …

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South Korean Panel Supports Nuclear Plant Construction, Rejecting President Moon’s Plan To Stop It

Supporters of South Korean nuclear energy are celebrating today. Earlier this morning, a citizen's panel decided that President Moon Jae-in had made a mistake by halting the Shin Kori 5 & 6 construction projects. The 471-member panel, formed by President Moon to provide advice about his plan to phase out one of the world's most successful […] The post South Korean Panel Supports Nuclear Plant Construction, Rejecting President Moon's Plan To Stop It appeared first on The Energy Collective. Click headline for full …

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Almost 40% of Global Liquefied Natural Gas Trade Moves Through the South China Sea

The South China Sea is a major route for liquefied natural gas (LNG) trade, and in 2016, almost 40% of global LNG trade, or about 4.7 trillion cubic feet (Tcf), passed through the South China Sea. The South China Sea is an important trade route for Malaysia and Qatar. The two LNG exporters collectively accounted […] The post Almost 40% of Global Liquefied Natural Gas Trade Moves Through the South China Sea appeared first on The Energy Collective. Click headline for full article

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We Already Know Which Grid Fixes Can Keep Lights On During Bad Storms. Here Are 3

After a record-breaking hurricane season and catastrophic wildfires in California, the vulnerabilities of our electric system – and the urgent need to upgrade it – have never been clearer. It took more than 10 days of around-the-clock work to restore electricity to 350,000 customers after fires struck California wine country last month. Returning service to […] The post We Already Know Which Grid Fixes Can Keep Lights On During Bad Storms. Here Are 3 appeared first on The Energy Collective. Click headline for full article

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Is The U.S. Solar Boom In Jeopardy?

The U.S. solar industry has surged in recent years, accounting for the largest source of new electric capacity in the past year, with plenty of room to grow. However, the Trump administration is weighing a trade tariff that could seriously curtail the explosive growth figures for U.S. solar. The post, Is The U.S. Solar Boom […] The post Is The U.S. Solar Boom In Jeopardy? appeared first on The Energy Collective. Click headline for full article

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U.S. Shale Oil: The Limits to Growth

With technological progress slowing down and financiers becoming more reluctant to invest, estimates of future US shale oil production are becoming more conservative, writes geophysicist Jilles van den Beukel. By the early 2020s, the ability of US shale oil to provide a ceiling on oil prices will be significantly diminished. US shale oil has had […] The post U.S. Shale Oil: The Limits to Growth appeared first on The Energy Collective. Click headline for full article

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Everything You Need to Know About Climate Tipping Points

Imagine cutting down a tree. Initially, you chop and chop … but not much seems to change. Then suddenly, one stroke of the hatchet frees the trunk from its base and the once distant leaves come crashing down. It's an apt metaphor for one of the most alarming aspects of climate change – the existence […] The post Everything You Need to Know About Climate Tipping Points appeared first on The Energy Collective. Click headline for full article

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Is A Subsidy On LED Lighting Economically Viable?

The governments in many countries have been nudging their citizens to move away from electricity guzzling incandescent bulbs to greener alternatives like LED. Incandescent bulbs are, in fact, banned in a number of countries. According to an estimate, the ban on the use of incandescent bulbs has helped Europe save as much as 40 TWh […] The post Is A Subsidy On LED Lighting Economically Viable? appeared first on The Energy Collective. Click headline for full article

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Petra Nova is One of Two Carbon Capture and Sequestration Power Plants in the World

The Petra Nova facility, a coal-fired power plant located near Houston, Texas, is one of only two operating power plants with carbon capture and storage (CCS) in the world, and it is the only such facility in the United States. The 110 megawatt (MW) Boundary Dam plant in Saskatchewan, Canada, near the border with North […] The post Petra Nova is One of Two Carbon Capture and Sequestration Power Plants in the World appeared first on The Energy Collective. Click headline for full article

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The Better World Tour comes home to Boston

On Sept. 28, the Better World tour was back in MIT's own neighborhood, at the Boch Center Wang Theatre in downtown Boston. More than 1,000 MIT alumni and friends were in attendance to celebrate the MIT Campaign for a Better World, a galvanizing effort that has gathered momentum and participation since the its public launch in May 2016, at events …

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MIT researchers respond to hurricanes Irma and Maria

As Hurricane Irma and Hurricane Maria approached the Caribbean late this summer, public and private supply chains already affected and stretched thin by August's Hurricane Harvey had to ramp up again. Coordination was even more critical in order to leverage all available logistics capacity to meet human needs. MIT's Humanitarian Response Lab joined the effort, operating from the Federal Emergency Management …

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There's something in the water

Groundwater in rural Bangladesh contains arsenic at 10 to 100 times the amount of safe consumption levels, but is consumed as drinking water from wells and has led to cases of heart disease and cancer. Traces of arsenic are also consumed through rice, a staple food of the densely-populated country. Professor Charles Harvey and graduate student Brittany Huhmann, both from the MIT Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE), traveled to Bangladesh during the 2015 and 2016 growing seasons to see how …

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Boeing Acquires Aurora Flight Sciences For Autonomous Flights

If you thought autonomous cars were freaking out some older drivers, wait until you hear the one about autonomous flights. Boeing is acquiring Aurora Flight Sciences, a company we mentioned here a little while back. This is throwing serious weight into the vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) industry Boeing Acquires Aurora Flight Sciences For Autonomous Flights was originally …

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Next Generation of EV Charging (#Electrifying Webinar with Peter Badik, GreenWay)

For years, it has been clear — electric car customers want superfast (not just "fast") charging available for long-distance travel. It has also been clear that only Tesla has looked out for its customers in regards to this. It wasn't until this year that any other charging companies really started offering products capable of this, and there still aren't any electric cars on the market that could charge more than 100 kW anyway — hence the lack of supply of non-Tesla superchargers

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Cellular reprograming implicated in model of Alzheimer's disease

Microglia, immune cells that act as the central nervous system's damage sensors, have recently been implicated in Alzheimer's disease. The cells, a type of macrophage that clear away dead cells from the brain and help to maintain healthy neuronal wiring, were found to be entangled with toxic amyloid beta plaques in tissue taken from those suffering from the disease. Researchers had previously believed that the cells help to protect the brain from neurodegeneration by digesting the amyloid plaques, but it now …

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International Policy Lab issues new call for proposals

The International Policy Lab (IPL) within the Center for International Studies has issued its third Institute-wide call for proposals. The IPL helps leading MIT researchers develop the policy implications of their research and better inform the policymaking community in the United States and abroad. It provides funding and staff support for translating scholarly work into digestible, policy-relevant materials and for direct outreach to policymakers. “We are very pleased …